What Do Successful Business Leaders Have in Common?

Adam Bryant is a Pulitzer Prize award-winning journalist at The New York Times who probably is best known for his long-running column “Corner Office.”

Over the years, Bryant discovered that there is a natural curiosity among readers about the people who make it to the top. Now his insightful new book, The Corner Office: Indispensable and Unexpected Lessons from CEOs on How to Lead and Succeed, gives readers the inside scoop on how business leaders think.

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Lighten Up and Get Ahead

Research reveals that leaders of successful companies have two traits in common: A sense of humor about themselves and a willingness to laugh at things. In other words, a dash of fun and levity in the workplace can work wonders. But gender differences in humor are no laughing matter. To avoid humor misfires, follow these tips…

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GenderTalk Tips

Men and women working together, swapping ideas as equals and sharing power has become the workplace norm. But because they may lead in different ways and communicate in different ways, misunderstandings are often inevitable.

Both men and women’s communication styles make sense within the context of their gender culture. They each have their strength and weaknesses. But both can take simple win-win steps to increase understanding and help bridge the gender gap in communications…

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The X-Factor: Do You Have It?

In a study of the performance evaluations of nearly 58,000 senior-level executives, female managers ranked higher than their male counterparts in 20 out of 23 categories. The primary category where women fell furthest behind? Confidence and executive presence. The good news for women, however, is that confidence is easier to develop than competence.

Executive presence is that elusive X-Factor that can make or break a career. Executive presence matters just as much as – sometimes even more than – impeccable credentials and an impressive track record. It can even compensate for resume weaknesses

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Lessons Learned From My “Passage To India”

What are the challenges when 4,000 years of tradition clash with high-tech innovation and workplace diversity? This is the question I pondered as I set out for a two-week speaking tour in India. Every year the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi invites experts to tour and lecture on topical issues. During my visit, the impact of women in the economy was identified as a top priority, and I was honored to be selected as their guest speaker.

India, the world’s fourth-largest economy, has a problem. Fortunately, it also has available solutions. And U.S companies can learn a lot by watching how India implements those solutions.

With an annual growth rate of 7 percent, India is in the superpower class of nations. Inhibiting further growth, however, is a troubling reality: Women constitute less than 25 percent of the workforce. With an anticipated shortage of 5 million skilled laborers in the next few years, India has a pressing need for more women in the workplace if the economy is going to continue its exceptional rate of growth.

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